Student Research

The Faculty of Kinesiology has undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral scholar researchers.

Kinesiology's research areas

Research is an excellent way to explore areas of a discipline that interests you. Excellent research facilities and instructors can help you translate discoveries into applications that benefit local, national and international communities.

We have four main research themes in the Faculty of Kinesiology. 

 

Movement science & musculoskeletal health

Injury prevention, sport medicine & rehabilitation

Exercise physiology & nutrition in health & sport

Psychosocial aspects of health & sport


Tips to begin research

Attend lectures, journal clubs and research conferences on and off campus. Many faculties and institutes have undergraduate research symposiums where students can present their work, or watch graduate students present their research at the three minute thesis competition. This will give you an idea about what is involved in conducting research. Or, get a little inspiration from other undergrads or grad students in Kinesiology. 

It’s also helpful to spend time with professors, postdoctoral fellows and thesis-based graduate students as they can give you valuable advice. Consider volunteering in a laboratory as this may lead to authorship on a publication, a paid research position or pursuing further education. Once you find an area of interest, the next step is to find a supervisor. 

undergrad in the physiology lab

Undergraduate research

Study what interests you with experts in the field. Kickstart your research career as an undergraduate.

Calaine Inglis graduate

Graduate research

The Faculty of Kinesiology offers two thesis-based degree programs, A Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy.

Post doc scholar in the lab

Postdoctoral scholars

Kinesiology postdoctoral scholars are national and international leaders in areas such as exercise, sport, nutrition, metabolism and genetics.

Student combines research and play

Patrick Pankow plays football for the Dinos and pursues an interest in sport concussion research with an MSc in Kinesiology.