Dr. Brent Edwards, PhD

Brent Edwards

Associate Professor

Faculty of Kinesiology

Associate Professor

Schulich School of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering

Full Member

McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health

Media contacts

Leanne Yohemas - Director, Communications and Marketing, Faculty of Kinesiology. 

 

Web presence

Phone number

Office: 403.210.8950

Location

Office: KNB418

Background

Educational Background

PhD Biomechanics, Iowa State University, 2009

MSc Biomechanics, California State University, Sacramento, 2005

BSc Kinesiology, Exercise Science, California State University, Sacramento, 2003

Research

Areas of Research

Biomechanics, Engineering Mechanics, Mechanical Fatigue, Osteoporosis

Participation in university strategic initiatives

Courses

Course number Course title Semester
KNES 393 Research Seminar l Fall 2021
KNES 395 Research Seminar II Fall 2021
KNES 664 Bone and Joint Biomechanics Fall 2021

Projects

Biomechanical experimentation with advanced medical imaging and computational modeling

Mechanical fatigue of load bearing biological tissue is an inevitable consequence of physical activity. Over time, habitual loading of the musculoskeletal system causes microdamage accumulation that reduces the overall quality of the tissue and leads to a reduction in stiffness and an increase in mechanical strain with continued loading. Without adequate tissue repair and adaptation, the evolution and accumulation of microdamage may eventually lead to musculoskeletal injury. Mechanical fatigue is believed to play a predominant role in the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal injuries such as bone stress fracture as well as Achilles and patellar tendinopathy.

Our research combines biomechanical experimentation with advanced medical imaging and computational modeling to investigate tissue damage and fatigue in response to mechanical loading. Our unique approach allows us to estimate in vivo tissue mechanics in a non-invasive and subject-specific manner. The work in our group spans multiple dimensional scales, from basic experiments at the tissue-level that enhance our understanding of the mechanical fatigue process, to applied experiments at the whole-body level for the development of treatments and interventions to improve tissue quality and decrease injury risk.